Onion


Onion
(Allium cepa)

Onion sprouts are actually like miniature scallions that the onion seed produces. Usually a sprout is a root, but in case of onions, they are shoots.
Shoots are basically the plants that grow above the soil and Allium  sprouts are one among the most popular species of shoots.

Onion sprouts basically have the same taste as the mature onion and the same odour, minus the eye-watering.

Onion (Allium cepa)
Seed to Sprout in 10 – 15 Days
Yield = 4.5:1
Seed Shelf Life at 21°C/70° = 1 – 2 years
Sprout Shelf Life = 2 – 4 weeks

Nutritional info:
Vitamins A, B, C, and E
Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Zinc
Carotene, Chlorophyll
Amino Acids
Trace Elements
Protein: 20%

Allium is the Latin name for the plant family that includes Garlic, Leek and Onion, the seeds of which are valuable. These little black seeds produce some of the strongest, most recognisable flavours!

Allium sprouts taste just like the plants which they produce in the garden (so often the case with sprouts). These seeds are all expensive because they are hard seeds to produce, taking farmers years to establish, so they are short in supply. On top of the cost, there are other things unique to Alliums: they take longer to grow than many other sprouts and the seed is short lived under normal storage conditions. Freezing the seed will extend the viability of the seed by years. Without freezing, it is unlikely that these seeds will germinate after a year.

A very important factor when discussing Allium sprouts is the fact that they have a very rich and nutritional content. Onion sprouts are full of vitamins A, B, C and E and the quantity of calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and zinc is also important. Besides these, onion sprouts are very rich in proteins, which is very rare for such plants, with a 20% protein content. Due to their important nutrients and vitamins, onion sprouts are very healthy and can be used in many delicious recipes.

The onion is the most widely cultivated species of the genus Allium, also known as the bulb onion or common onion. The genus Allium also contains a number of other species variously referred to as onions and cultivated for food, such as the potato onion (A. cepa var. aggregatum), Japanese bunching onion (A. fistulosum), Egyptian onion (A. ×proliferum), and Canada onion (A. canadense). The name "wild onion" is applied to a number of Allium species.

The vast majority of cultivars of A. cepa belong to the 'common onion group' (A. cepa var. cepa) and are usually referred to simply as 'onions'. The 'Aggregatum group' of cultivars (A. cepa var. aggregatum) includes both shallots and potato onions.

Allium cepa is known only in cultivation, but related wild species occur in Central Asia. The most closely related species include Allium vavilovii (Popov & Vved.) and Allium asarense (R.M. Fritsch & Matin) from Iran. However, Zohary and Hopf warn that "there are doubts whether the A. vavilovii collections tested represent genuine wild material or only feral derivatives of the crop".

Wide-ranging claims have been made for the effectiveness of onions against conditions ranging from the common cold to heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, and other diseases. They contain chemical compounds believed to have anti-inflammatory, anticholesterol, anticancer, and antioxidant properties, such as quercetin. Preliminary studies have shown increased consumption of onions reduces the risk of head and neck cancers. In India some sects do not eat onion due to its alleged aphrodisiac properties. Many also believe eating onions can lead to weight loss; this claim, however, has never been substantiated.

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